Learning Curves

Note: I'll be out of town for the next couple of days--sorry I am slow to respond to emails and comments, but I do appreciate them.
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In every occupation, there is a learning curve:

A Des Moines man allegedly broke off breaking and entering after severely cutting his ankle on the glass of a screen door he kicked in Tuesday night.

Carnell Vernard Williams, 29, faces an attempted burglary charge after police say he tried to kick his way into an apartment in the 1800 block of Mondamin Avenue.

Lacreta White, 30, called police at 10:33 p.m. when she saw a foot wearing a white shoe punch through her screen door. The man on the other end of the foot was Williams, who had previously threatened White, witnesses told police...

Police found Williams at Broadlawns Medical Center receiving treatment for his injuries...

Williams provided a voluntary blood sample to police, who arrested him after medical staff finished treating his wound.

From my patrolling days, I remember a wanna-be thug who did something stupidly similar. The guy was so embarrassed, after his arrest at the hospital, that I never saw him charged with another crime.

Hopefully, Mr. Williams' will have a similar epiphany, and transition into a more law-abiding profession.

7 comments:

Matthew MacNish said...

That would be nice. Justice.

Brian Miller said...

here is to hoping he learned a lesson....

Beth Zimmerman said...

I always enjoy reading those Darwin awards things about criminal types doing stupid things and getting direct retribution!

KittyCat said...

Hey
I ment to ask if you followed the Anthony trial
and what your thoughts were .

Clarissa Draper said...

Funny. They say thieves are not the brightest.

Maxi said...

This story falls into the category of "America's Dumbest Criminals."

Maybe he will go straight now.

Slamdunk said...

Thanks for the comments.

@ KittyCat: Thanks for asking. I have not followed the case as close as others and think Maxi (Maxi's Comments) and others have done a wonderful job laying out the specifics of the trial.

With that said my uneducated thoughts include: I believe she is guilty, but the State seemed to lack a "slamdunk" with the evidence to prove intent versus carelessness, and the story of the meter reader (who found the body) makes little sense to me and I can understand how the defense was apparently effective in arguing that evidence taken from the body could have been tampered with.

Finally, the prolonged laughing attack that the prosecutor seemed to battle made him appear arrogant--never a good thing in court.